Effectively Fighting Disease Risk Despite Science Controlled By Corporate Interests | T. Colin Campbell, Ph.D. | The Real Truth About Health

“For decades T. Colin Campbell, Ph.D. has been at the forefront of nutrition education and research. Dr. Campbell’s expertise and scientific interests encompass relationships between diet and disease, particularly the causation of cancer. His legacy, the China Project, is one of the most comprehensive studies of health and nutrition ever conducted. The New York Times has recognized the study as the “Grand Prix of epidemiology.”

Dr. Campbell is the coauthor of the bestselling book The China Study: Startling Implications for Diet, Weight Loss, and Long-term Health, and author of the New York Times bestseller Whole, and The Low-Carb Fraud. He is featured in several documentaries including the blockbuster Forks Over Knives, Eating You Alive, Food Matters, Plant Pure Nation and others. He is the founder of the T. Colin Campbell Center for Nutrition Studies and the online Plant-Based Nutrition Certificate in partnership with eCornell.

Dr. Campbell has conducted original research both in laboratory experiments and in large-scale human studies; received over 70 grant-years of peer-reviewed research funding (mostly with NIH), served on grant review panels of multiple funding agencies, actively participated in the development of national and international nutrition policy, authored over 300 research papers and given hundreds of lectures around the world.

He was trained at Cornell University (M.S., Ph.D.) and MIT (Research Associate) in nutrition, biochemistry, and toxicology. Dr. Campbell spent 10 years on the faculty of Virginia Tech’s Department of Biochemistry and Nutrition before returning to Cornell in 1975 where he presently holds his Endowed Chair as the Jacob Gould Schurman Professor Emeritus of Nutritional Biochemistry in the Division of Nutritional Sciences.

Connect with The Real Truth About Health http://www.therealtruthabouthealth.com/

https://www.facebook.com/The-Real-Tru… https://www.instagram.com/therealtrut…

https://twitter.com/RTAHealth

Passionate believers in whole food plant based diets, no chemicals, minimal pharmaceutical drugs, no GMO’s. Fighting to stop climate change and extinction.”

Vegan Sweet Potato Recipes: Baked, Roasted, and Beyond from ForksOverKnives.com

We’ve rounded up our favorite sweet potato recipes, from savory to sweet. Try one of these sweet potato recipes tonight!

Quick-cooking, easy to store, and oh-so-delicious, the humble sweet potato is a nutritionally rich, colorful, extremely handy vegetable to keep around. Baked, roasted, steamed, boiled, stuffed, or pureed, sweet potato boasts a velvety texture and earthy-sweet flavor that’s great in both sweet and savory dishes. To showcase their tasty versatility we’ve put together a collection of 27 vegan sweet potato recipes. Bonus: All recipes are free from oil, meat, dairy, and heavily processed ingredients!

Source: Vegan Sweet Potato Recipes: Baked, Roasted, and Beyond

Why Self Care Isn’t Selfish | Goodbye Lupus by Brooke Goldner, M.D.

So many people with chronic illness struggle with self-care. .

They can understand eating to get healthy, but the idea of taking time out to just relax and feel happy feels like they are being a bad person who is selfish. .

Here is some coaching from my 6 Week Rapid Recovery Group on this topic that I hope can help you too.

.

So many people with chronic illness struggle with self-care. November 20, and will run over Thanksgiving and the winter holidays, so only sign up if you want to get better MORE than you want to eat all those traditional unhealthy foods because there are no cheat days on rapid recovery!

.

You can learn more about the group at https://goodbyelupus.com/work-with-do…

.

If you haven’t learned the nutrition plan yet make sure you go to goodbyelupus.com and click on the free classes this week! For more info: ► Subscribe to My Channel: http://www.youtube.com/c/BrookeGoldnerMD ►Where to follow and listen to Dr. G: ►FREE WEBINAR: http://goodbyelupus.com/6-steps-to-re… ►FREE healing recipes and support: SmoothieShred.com ►Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/goodbyelupus/ ►Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drgoldner ►Twitter: https://twitter.com/VeganMedicalDoc ►To learn more about rapid recovery or make an appointment with Dr. G go to http://goodbyelupus.com ►6 Week Rapid Recovery Group: http://goodbyelupus.com/group-healing Dr.

Brooke Goldner is a board certified medical doctor and the author of 3 best-selling books, Goodbye Autoimmune Disease, Goodbye Lupus and Green Smoothie Recipes to Kick-Start Your Health & Healing. She has been featured in multiple documentaries such as Eating You Alive, Whitewashed, and The Conspiracy Against Your Health, has been featured on TV news and the Home & Family Show, as well as many radio shows and podcasts, and is a highly sought after keynote speaker, who shares the stage regularly with Drs. Ornish, Esselstyn, Bernard Greger and T. Colin Campbell, to name a few. She has been featured on the front cover of Vegan Health & Fitness Magazine 3 times, including the current cover of Fit Over Forty. She is a graduate of the Temple University School of Medicine, was Chief Resident at UCLA-Harbor Residency, and holds a certificate in Plant-Based Nutrition from Cornell University. She is the founder of GoodbyeLupus.com, VeganMedicalDoctor.com, and creator of the Hyper-nourishing Protocol for Lupus Recovery.

MEDICAL DISCLAIMER All the information provided by Brooke Goldner, M.D. and associated videos are strictly for informational purposes only. It is not intended as a substitute for advice from your health care provider or physician. The information provided by Brooke Goldner, M.D. and associated videos cannot be used to make a diagnosis or treat any health condition. The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such. The information in this video is provided “as is” without any representations or warranties, express or implied. Brooke Goldner, M.D. is not acting as your medical provider. —-

Aaya’s Table — A CNS Microgrant Recipient Provides Hospitals With Culinary Assistance – Center for Nutrition Studies

 

Aaya’s Table — A CNS Microgrant Recipient Provides Hospitals With Culinary Assistance

The following is an article from a Community Leads grant recipient.

A weathered envelope with international stamps delivered from India would sometimes arrive in my family’s mailbox. First to our townhouse in Australia and then, when we moved to the US, all the way to the suburbs of Minneapolis. As a child, these letters always brought a big smile to my face because they would be addressed to a “Master Varun,” the polite British English title used for a boy too young to be called “Mister.” Growing up, I only ever heard two people address anyone that way—the character Alfred from the Batman comics and my thaatha (grandfather) who hailed from the small village of Tindivanam and kept his English sharp with those letters to me.

Soon after I turned eleven, those beloved letters stopped coming.We had gone earlier that year to India to visit our extended family, but the trip turned from joyous and relaxing to a panicked health crisis when I was awoken in the middle of the night on the remote family farm by the sound of thaatha’s loud groans, coughing, and spitting. Hours later in the hospital, I learned that thaatha had been suffering from congestive heart failure. He survived the night, but lived only a few months longer. He was 67 years old.

Support the Community Leads Program

Make a Gift

The following year, my thaatha on my father’s side passed suddenly from a cardiac event at 68 years of age. Next, an uncle passed away from complications from a stroke he had suffered in his early 40s a decade earlier. A couple years after that, my mom’s only brother, 47 at the time, succumbed to a massive heart attack. My aaya (grandmother) was the longest-living relative I knew, living to a grand 75 years of age, out living a son and husband, and enduring worsening diabetes for nearly fifteen years before we got the late-night overseas call that is infamous among many immigrants with family abroad. By college, I had a genuine fear any time the phone rang past seven or eight in the evening. The creeping thought was always: “Who is it this time?” After a ten-year respite, my father’s oldest sister died suddenly at 62 after her previously untreated diabetes progressed to kidney disease, and my 24-year-old cousin lost his battle with leukemia. Like many southeast Asians, my fate seemed sealed by genetics.

Aaya’s Table

Considering my family history, it should be no big surprise that I was pre-med in college. Joining the world of medicine was the only way I could think to avenge or somehow honor the deaths in the family. I wound up becoming a biomedical engineer and found great satisfaction in product development in the medical device industry. I started as a bright-eyed kid whose every working moment was filled with the promise and potential of improving medicine and helping people. It took almost ten years in the industry, beginning at a startup and working my way into a large corporation, before I identified a glaring contradiction: despite the advancements in medical technology that I was a part of, the prevalence of chronic illness was continuing to grow and our healthcare system was struggling to manage it.

I always cite The China Study as the big inspiration for pivoting my career. My partner at the time (now fiancé) had recommended it for my long commutes, and the timing of when I finished it was really uncanny. I finished it just before landing in New Orleans for the Orthopedic Research Society conference. Normally I would gravitate toward the talks and presentations with the most novel science behind them, but that conference I found myself revisiting this one particular poster from the Midwest detailing how newer joint replacement implants didn’t survive much better than age-old tech because of obesity, diabetes, and other chronic illnesses that I had just been reading could be prevented with food. It was a lightbulb moment for me, and also very humbling since I was the lead engineer designing a robotically implanted, 3D-printed knee replacement device.

A few months later, I took on a role as Brand Ambassador for Beyond Meat, who were not yet public. I didn’t know exactly how to do it, but I wanted to be part of the movement of weaning America off the foods deleterious to their health. As a bonus, Beyond Meat still had that exciting startup feel that I was missing from the earliest part of my career. I began by working evenings and weekends to help share my newfound passion for plant-based nutrition.

By then I essentially had one foot out the door of the medical device industry but since I’m rather risk averse, I was still waiting for my own vision of how to influence healthcare. There’s a proverb that with every step one takes, regardless of knowing the particular direction, it’s the right step and will beget the next; standing still gets you nowhere. Over the six months or so, I had facetime with close to a thousand individuals that allowed me to discuss not only plant-based meat alternatives, but also the underlying motivations and challenges of lifestyle change. The common challenge I heard again and again was the need for more resources and support. Connecting the dots between eating well and achieving improved health is not always obvious or easy. By early 2019, I had the direction I needed to start Aaya’s Table and a mission to bring healthy, whole food, plant-based (WFPB) home cooking to diverse American homes.

In name and purpose Aaya’s Table pays homage to family history, both mine and those of too many others that have seen the effects of chronic illness on their loved ones. Whereas we typically associate grandma’s cooking and those special family recipes with comfort and homeliness, I want to also solidify the link between that food and good health. Following a predominantly plant-based diet to improve wellbeing does not have to mean forgoing the good food we grew up eating. In many cases, the old culinary traditions were in fact better for us than we ever realized. The Aaya’s Table team works with our clients to learn about their preferred cuisines and food aversions to ensure that they keep the familiar flavors while leaving behind the added oils, sugars, and animal products we know cause chronic disease.

Aaya’s Table — A CNS Microgrant Recipient Provides Hospitals With Culinary Assistance

This personalized approach emphasizes cultural significance. The ability to cater meal plans to people of all backgrounds is a major differentiator for us, and stems in part from my own challenges when becoming plant-based. I grew up eating the most flavorful and spicy Indian dishes, most of which begin with a sauté of onion, garlic, ginger and spices in heaping of oil or butter—a thali or takda. That’s the backbone of a lot of the food I love, so when I decided to change my diet, and to become WFPB at that, I couldn’t relate to many of the recipes out there. Many of our clients face similar challenges when trying to embrace change, and we believe that it does a big disservice to give up the complex flavors and aromas of their generations-old family recipes in exchange for brown rice and steamed veggies. So, we strive for even better than the middle ground and more than just a sprinkle of dried chili flakes.

Ultimately, I want delicious meals to lead to impressive stories of health regained. Aaya’s Table is the culinary arm that physicians embracing lifestyle change can refer their patients to. That relationship and trust with healthcare providers is not altogether different from those from my medical device days. Only now, I’m proud to be able to share with them the success stories of individuals partaking in our Culinary Rehabilitation (CuReTM) Program. We have some strong early results, but there remains a long journey before “food as medicine” takes its rightful place as a cornerstone of our healthcare system. Hopefully Aaya’s Table can make some significant contributions along with the inspiring work of other plant-based leaders.

Eat well, feel better.
-Varun Ponmudi

The T. Colin Campbell Center for Nutrition Studies (CNS) is committed to increasing awareness of the extraordinary impact that food has on the health of our bodies, our communities, and our planet. In support of this commitment, CNS has created a Community Leads service initiative to empower sustainable food-based initiatives around the world by providing grants to enable innovative start-ups and to propel the growth of existing initiatives. Please consider making a donation to this great cause. 100% of your donation will go to support initiatives like the one you just read about in this article.

Learn more about Community Leads:

https://nutritionstudies.org/community-leads-service-initiative/

Source: Aaya’s Table — A CNS Microgrant Recipient Provides Hospitals With Culinary Assistance – Center for Nutrition Studies

How We All Can Become Stronger | Dr. Pam Popper

Subscribe to Dr. Pam’s weekly newsletter and video clips here! https://wellnessforumhealth.com/news/

Give us a call at 614-841-7700.

You can find Pam on BitChute under the channel WellnessForumHealth and Parler under @WellnessForumHealth

Check out our websites at https://wellnessforumhealth.com and https://makeamericansfreeagain.com/

Chronic Health Instead of Chronic Disease | Dr. Pam Popper with quotes from Dr. David Katz

Subscribe to Dr. Pam’s weekly newsletter and video clips here! https://wellnessforumhealth.com/news/
Give us a call at 614-841-7700.
You can find Pam on BitChute under the channel WellnessForumHealth and Parler under @WellnessForumHealth

Plant versus Animal Iron | Dr. Michael Greger @ NutritionFacts.org

It is commonly thought that those who eat plant-based diets may be more prone to iron deficiency, but it turns out that they’re no more likely to suffer from iron deficiency anemia than anybody else. This may be because not only do those eating meat-free diets tend to get more fiber, magnesium, and vitamins like A, C, and E, but they also get more iron.

The iron found predominantly in plants is non-heme iron, which isn’t absorbed as well as the heme iron found in blood and muscle, but this may be a good thing. As seen in my video, The Safety of Heme vs. Non-Heme Iron, avoidance of heme iron may be one of the key elements of plant-based protection against metabolic syndrome, and may also be beneficial in lowering the risk from other chronic diseases such as heart disease.

The data linking coronary heart disease and the intake of iron, in general, has been mixed. This inconsistency of evidence may be because of where the iron comes from. The majority of total dietary iron is non-heme iron, coming mostly from plants. So, total iron intake is associated with lower heart disease risk, but iron intake from meat is associated with significantly higher risk for heart disease. This is thought to be because iron can act as a pro-oxidant, contributing to the development of atherosclerosis by oxidizing cholesterol with free radicals. The risk has been quantified as a 27% increase in coronary heart disease risk for every 1 milligram of heme iron consumed daily.

The same has been found for stroke risk. The studies on iron intake and stroke have had conflicting results, but that may be because they had never separated out heme iron from non-heme iron… until now. Researchers found that the intake of meat (heme) iron, but not plant (non-heme) iron, was associated with an increased risk of stroke.

The researchers also found that higher intake of heme iron—but not total or plant (non-heme) iron—was significantly associated with greater risk for type 2 diabetes. There may be a 16% increase in risk for type 2 diabetes for every 1 milligram of heme iron consumed daily.

The same has also been found for cancer, with up to 12% increased risk for every milligram of daily heme iron exposure. In fact, we can actually tell how much meat someone is eating by looking at their tumors. To characterize the mechanisms underlying meat-related lung cancer development, researchers asked lung cancer patients how much meat they ate and examined the gene expression patterns in their tumors. They identified a signature pattern of heme-related gene expression. Although they looked specifically at lung cancer, they expect these meat-related gene expression changes may occur in other cancers as well.

We do need to get enough iron, but only about 3% of premenopausal white women have iron deficiency anemia these days. However, the rates are worse in African and Mexican Americans. Taking into account our leading killers—heart disease, cancer, and diabetes—the healthiest source of iron appears to be non-heme iron, found naturally in abundance in whole grains, beans, split peas, chickpeas, lentils, dark green leafy vegetables, dried fruits, nuts, and seeds.

But how much money can be made on beans, though? The processed food industry came up with a blood-based crisp bread, made out of rye flour and blood from cattle and pigs, which is one of the most concentrated sources of heme iron, about two-thirds more than blood from chickens. If blood-based crackers don’t sound particularly appetizing, you can always snack on cow blood cookies. And, there are always blood-filled biscuits, whose filling has been described as “a dark-colored, chocolate flavored paste with a very pleasant taste.” (It’s dark-colored because spray-dried pig blood can have a darkening effect on the food product’s color.) The worry is not the color or taste, it’s the heme iron, which, because of its potential cancer risk, is not considered safe to add to foods intended for the general population.

Previously, I’ve touched on the double-edged iron sword in Risk Associated With Iron Supplements and Phytates for the Prevention of Cancer. It may also help answer Why Was Heart Disease Rare in the Mediterranean?

Those eating plant-based diets get more of most nutrients since whole plant foods are so nutrient dense. See Nutrient-Dense Approach to Weight Management.

In health,

Michael Greger, M.D.

PS: If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my free videos here and watch my live, year-in-review presentations:

Source: Plant versus Animal Iron | NutritionFacts.org

Cold and Flu Season: Healthy Immune System Strategies | Dr. David Marquis

Dr. David Marquis discusses strategies we can utilize to support strong immune system function during “Cold and Flu Season”; the importance of optimal vitamin D levels, sugar’s role, proper sleep, avoiding nutrient deficient foods, the benefits of consuming healthy fats, and the impact of the holidays on your microbiome. He also encourages parents to help guide their children towards anti-inflammatory, nutrient rich diet choices as we spend more time together.
Disclaimer: The entire contents of this Video and YouTube Channel are based upon the opinions of Dr. David Marquis, unless otherwise noted. Videos are based upon the opinions of the respective author. The information on this website is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with your own health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. It is intended as a sharing of knowledge and information from the research and experience of Dr. Marquis. Dr. Marquis encourages you to make your own health care decisions based upon your research and in partnership with your own health care professional. If you are pregnant, nursing, taking medication, or have a medical condition, consult your health care professional before using products.

The Pros And Cons Of Medical Probes And Government Health Guidelines | Dr. Pam Popper | The Real Truth About Health

Overmedicated, overfed, and malnourished, most Americans fail to realize the answer to lower disease rates doesn’t lie in more pills but in the foods we eat.With so much misleading nutritional information regarded as common knowledge, from “everything in moderation” to “avoid carbs,” the average American is ill-equipped to recognize the deadly force of abundant, cheap, unhealthy food options that not only offer no nutritional benefits but actually bring on a disease.

In this lecture, Pamela A. Popper, Ph.D. ND, speaks about the dire state of American health—the result of poor nutrition choices stemming from food politics and medical misinformation. But, more important, she shares the key to getting and staying healthy for life.

Backed by numerous scientific studies, Pamela A. Popper, Ph.D., ND details how dietary choices either build health or destroy it.

Connect with The Real Truth About Health http://www.therealtruthabouthealth.com/

https://www.facebook.com/The-Real-Tru…

https://twitter.com/RTAHealth

Passionate believers in whole food plant based diets, no chemicals, minimal pharmaceutical drugs, no GMO’s. Fighting to stop climate change and extinction.”

The Symptoms of Vitamin B12 Deficiency | Dr. Michael Greger, Nutritionfacts.org 

Vitamin B12 deficiency is known as “The Great Masquerader.” A look at the many facets of the symptoms.
Subscribe to NutritionFacts.org’s free e-newsletter and receive a recipe from Dr. Greger’s brand-new cookbook, The How Not to Diet Cookbook: https://nutritionfacts.org/subscribe/
This is the first in a 5-video series on B12. Stay tuned for:
• The Optimal Vitamin B12 Dosage for Adults (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-o…)
• Healthiest Food Sources of Vitamin B12 (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/healt…)
• The Optimal Vitamin B12 Dosage for Kids, Pregnancy, and Seniors (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-o…)
• The Best Type of Vitamin B12: Cyanocobalamin or Methylcobalamin? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-b…)
You can find all of these videos in a digital download here (https://drgreger.org/collections/down…), along with two additional videos that will be coming out in a few months.
Another consequence of B12 deficiency may be an increase in stroke risk:
• Vegetarians and Stroke Risk Factors—Vitamin B12 & Homocysteine? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/veget…)
• How to Test for Functional Vitamin B12 Deficiency (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-t…)
• Should Vegetarians Take Creatine to Normalize Homocysteine? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Shoul…)
• The Efficacy and Safety of Creatine for High Homocysteine (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-e…)
Have a question about this video? Leave it in the comment section at http://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-s… and someone on the NutritionFacts.org team will try to answer it.
Want to get a list of links to all the scientific sources used in this video? Click on Sources Cited at https://nutritionfacts.org/video/the-…. You’ll also find a transcript and acknowledgements for the video, my blog and speaking tour schedule, and an easy way to search (by translated language even) through our videos spanning more than 2,000 health topics.
If you’d rather watch these videos on YouTube, subscribe to my YouTube Channel here: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_…
Thanks for watching. I hope you’ll join in the evidence-based nutrition revolution! -Michael Greger, MD FACLM
Captions for this video are available in several languages. To find yours, click on the settings wheel on the lower-right of the video and then “Subtitles/CC.” Do you have feedback about the translations in this video? Please share it here along with the title of the video and language: https://nutritionfacts.zendesk.com/hc… https://NutritionFacts.org
• Books (including the NEW How Not to Diet Cookbook): https://nutritionfacts.org/books