INSIGHTS FROM AN OBESITY SPECIALIST WITH PLANT BASED OBESITY DR. JAMIE KANE | Chef AJ

Jamie Kane received his undergraduate degree from Columbia University, his MD at SUNY Downstate and completed his residency training in Internal Medicine at Yale University. He is double board certified in Internal Medicine and Obesity Medicine. In addition to being the director for Northwell Health’s Center for Weight Management, he is an Assistant Professor in the department of medicine at the Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell and serves as the chief of its section of Obesity Medicine. As section chief, he has started a resident continuity clinic in Obesity Medicine in addition to developing a comprehensive didactic curriculum for the residents, and a fellowship in Obesity Medicine (one of the first of its kind). The fellowship is now combined with the General Internal Medicine fellowship at Northwell and is a 2 year program involving clinical practice in obesity medicine, precepting residents in obesity and general medicine clinics, obtaining a master’s degree in public health from Hofstra University and conducting research in obesity medicine, particularly in areas involving public health and general medicine. Clinically, he has expanded the Center for Weight Management to 6 sites in the New York City and Long Island area with a total number of 9 clinicians actively involved in the program.

Beyond growing the Center for Weight Management, his primary focus as section chief has been on obesity education. In addition to the obesity medicine clinic and obesity medicine fellowship, he lectures medical students, residents, fellows and primary care physicians in addition to starting Obesity Medicine Grand Rounds and Journal Clubs, open to obesity medicine physicians, bariatric surgeons, primary care practitioners and relevant subspecialists. Additionally, his section of Obesity Medicine has conducted a survey among primary care internists at Northwell to determine attitudes, knowledge base, comfort levels and practice trends for patients with obesity in the primary care setting. We are using that information to design learning modules for primary care physicians on obesity medicine topics including how to approach the subject with patients, lifestyle management and counseling, medication management and appropriate referral trends. Finally the section has now engaging in variety of research projects including large scale national data, review of obesity medicine and surgery practices and relationships between lifestyle and obesity/wellness.

The focus of Dr. Kane’s career has been on taking a holistic approach to the management (and reversal) of obesity and chronic cardiometabolic disease. He has lectured around the country on the benefits of a whole foods, plant based diet and on lifestyle management as a primary modality for modulating these conditions. Personally he is an active athlete and maintains a plant-based lifestyle with his family.

http://www.parkavenueweight.com/

What Makes a Diet Inflammatory Vs. Anti-inflammatory | Dr. Brooke Goldner

Warning – I do some singing and dancing in this one 😂 . Question from the live Q&A last week about why people might feel better on other diets versus the Goodbye Lupus Protocol. And what does @paulaabdul have to do with it?

For more info:

► Subscribe to My Channel: http://www.youtube.com/c/BrookeGoldnerMD ►Where to follow and listen to Dr. G:

►FREE WEBINAR: http://goodbyelupus.com/6-steps-to-re…

►FREE healing recipes and support: SmoothieShred.com

►Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/goodbyelupus/

►Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drgoldner

►Twitter: https://twitter.com/VeganMedicalDoc

►To learn more about rapid recovery or make an appointment with Dr. G go to http://goodbyelupus.com

►6 Week Rapid Recovery Group: http://goodbyelupus.com/group-healing

Dr. Brooke Goldner is a board certified medical doctor and the author of 3 best-selling books, Goodbye Autoimmune Disease, Goodbye Lupus and Green Smoothie Recipes to Kick-Start Your Health & Healing. She has been featured in multiple documentaries such as Eating You Alive, Whitewashed, and The Conspiracy Against Your Health, has been featured on TV news and the Home & Family Show, as well as many radio shows and podcasts, and is a highly sought after keynote speaker, who shares the stage regularly with Drs. Ornish, Esselstyn, Bernard Greger and T. Colin Campbell, to name a few. She has been featured on the front cover of Vegan Health & Fitness Magazine 3 times, including the current cover of Fit Over Forty. She is a graduate of the Temple University School of Medicine, was Chief Resident at UCLA-Harbor Residency, and holds a certificate in Plant-Based Nutrition from Cornell University. She is the founder of GoodbyeLupus.com, VeganMedicalDoctor.com, and creator of the Hyper-nourishing Protocol for Lupus Recovery.

Milk – It Doesn’t Do A Body Good. — Plant-Strong by Engine 2

Don’t believe any of the dairy industry’s claims about the so-called bone-strengthening benefits of milk. In fact, quite the opposite is true.

When consumed, animal products create an acidic environment in the bloodstream. In response, the body leeches calcium from the bones in order to neutralize the acid. Consumption of dairy products, especially those which are low- or non-fat (meaning they have a higher percentage of protein), can therefore lead to lower levels of calcium in the body.

Indeed, one set of studies published by The BMJ analyzing 100,000 people for two decades suggested that milk can actually increase the rates of bone and hip fractures, which might explain why some of the highest rates of osteoporosis are found in the countries with the highest rates of dairy consumption. Americans consume more calcium from dairy products than any other nation and yet we have the highest incidence of osteoporosis. Something must give, and it turns out to be your bones.

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It seems the negative effects of milk on the body only become worse with age.

Think about this for a moment: Milk is specifically designed to help a baby—whether it’s a calf or a human—grow as fast as possible. That’s why milk is packed with growth hormones and sex steroid hormones like estrogen. When you’ve stopped growing, however, these hormones help grow cancerous tumors instead of bones.

The association between milk and prostate cancer was proved by a study published in the journal Nutrition and Cancer. These researchers dripped milk directly onto prostate cancer cells in a laboratory, which had the effect of turbo-charging the cancer progression in each of the 14 experiments they performed, fueling the cancer growth rate by more than 30 percent. Moreover, a 2015 meta-analysis published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition concluded that high intakes of dairy products, including whole and low-fat milk, appears to increase a man’s risk of prostate cancer.

The research even suggests milk can cause problems even before birth—“Women attempting conception should avoid milk and dairy products,” concluded one study in The Journal of Reproductive Medicine. Why? Because potentially unsafe complications such as twinning may occur, which may explain why women who eat entirely plant-based diets give birth to twins at just one-fifth the rate as omnivores.

All the evidence screams one simple point: Dairy milk is unsafe at any age. Leave cow’s milk for baby cows. Repeat after me, “No moo milk here!”

Repeat it with me again: Don’t Drink Your Calories! What’s left to drink, then?

Here’s a hint: It’s colorless, odorless, transparent, and it’s the most important liquid in the entire universe.

I’m talking about water. Not vitamin water, coconut water, fruit water, or any other flavored calorie-infested crap. Just plain old water. Not drinking enough of it has been linked to bone fractures, heart disease, lung conditions, kidney stones, colon cancer, urinary tract infections, constipation, cavities, compromised immune systems… I can keep going for pages and pages. Don’t want bladder cancer? Drink more water. A Harvard University study of nearly 50,000 men found that the risk of this painful and deadly condition drops by 7 percent for every cup of water you drink daily. Don’t want a heart attack? Drink more water. The Adventist Health Study, which followed more than 20,000 people, determined that people who drink five or more glasses of water per day have half the risk of dying from heart disease compared to people who drank two glasses or less.

Drink water and drink it often.

This is an excerpt from Pillar #3 in the Engine 2 Seven-Day Rescue Diet on why we don’t drink our food.

Learn how you can build daily habits that include exercise #nomatterwhat as part of our Rescue 10x Program. Join the waitlist here! Next group kicks off January 2021!

Source: Milk – It Doesn’t Do A Body Good. — Plant-Strong by Engine 2

The Many Health Benefits Of Fasting – Alan Goldhamer, D.C. | The Real Truth About Health

The Many Health Benefits Of Fasting by Alan Goldhamer, D.C.

Articulate, inspiring and energetic, Dr. Goldhamer is one of the most pioneering and dedicated visionaries in health today. An outspoken professional who doesn’t shy away from a spirited debate, he is deeply committed to helping people stuck in self-destructive cycles reclaim their ability to change their lives.

Dr. Goldhamer has supervised the fasts of thousands of patients. Under his guidance, the Center has become one of the premier training facilities for doctors wishing to gain certification in the supervision of therapeutic fasting.

Dr. Goldhamer was the principal investigator in two landmark studies. The first: “Medically Supervised Water-Only Fasting in the Treatment of Hypertension” appeared in the June 2001 issue of the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics. Its publication marked a turning point in the evolution of evidence supporting the benefits of water-only fasting. The second study: “Medically Supervised Water-Only Fasting in the Treatment of Borderline Hypertension,” appeared in the October 2002 issue of the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine.

Currently, Dr. Goldhamer is directing a team that is developing a prospective study, incorporating random assignment and long-term follow-up on the cost and clinical outcomes in the treatment of diabetes and high blood pressure with fasting and a health-promoting diet.

After completing his chiropractic education at Western States Chiropractic College in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Goldhamer traveled to Australia, where he became licensed as an osteopathic physician. He is the author of The Health Promoting Cookbook and co-author of The Pleasure Trap: Mastering The Hidden Force That Undermines Health and Happiness.

Connect with The Real Truth About Health http://www.therealtruthabouthealth.com/

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Passionate believers in whole food plant based diets, no chemicals, minimal pharmaceutical drugs, no GMO’s. Fighting to stop climate change and extinction.

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Why Self Care Isn’t Selfish | Goodbye Lupus by Brooke Goldner, M.D.

So many people with chronic illness struggle with self-care. .

They can understand eating to get healthy, but the idea of taking time out to just relax and feel happy feels like they are being a bad person who is selfish. .

Here is some coaching from my 6 Week Rapid Recovery Group on this topic that I hope can help you too.

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So many people with chronic illness struggle with self-care. November 20, and will run over Thanksgiving and the winter holidays, so only sign up if you want to get better MORE than you want to eat all those traditional unhealthy foods because there are no cheat days on rapid recovery!

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You can learn more about the group at https://goodbyelupus.com/work-with-do…

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If you haven’t learned the nutrition plan yet make sure you go to goodbyelupus.com and click on the free classes this week! For more info: ► Subscribe to My Channel: http://www.youtube.com/c/BrookeGoldnerMD ►Where to follow and listen to Dr. G: ►FREE WEBINAR: http://goodbyelupus.com/6-steps-to-re… ►FREE healing recipes and support: SmoothieShred.com ►Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/goodbyelupus/ ►Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drgoldner ►Twitter: https://twitter.com/VeganMedicalDoc ►To learn more about rapid recovery or make an appointment with Dr. G go to http://goodbyelupus.com ►6 Week Rapid Recovery Group: http://goodbyelupus.com/group-healing Dr.

Brooke Goldner is a board certified medical doctor and the author of 3 best-selling books, Goodbye Autoimmune Disease, Goodbye Lupus and Green Smoothie Recipes to Kick-Start Your Health & Healing. She has been featured in multiple documentaries such as Eating You Alive, Whitewashed, and The Conspiracy Against Your Health, has been featured on TV news and the Home & Family Show, as well as many radio shows and podcasts, and is a highly sought after keynote speaker, who shares the stage regularly with Drs. Ornish, Esselstyn, Bernard Greger and T. Colin Campbell, to name a few. She has been featured on the front cover of Vegan Health & Fitness Magazine 3 times, including the current cover of Fit Over Forty. She is a graduate of the Temple University School of Medicine, was Chief Resident at UCLA-Harbor Residency, and holds a certificate in Plant-Based Nutrition from Cornell University. She is the founder of GoodbyeLupus.com, VeganMedicalDoctor.com, and creator of the Hyper-nourishing Protocol for Lupus Recovery.

MEDICAL DISCLAIMER All the information provided by Brooke Goldner, M.D. and associated videos are strictly for informational purposes only. It is not intended as a substitute for advice from your health care provider or physician. The information provided by Brooke Goldner, M.D. and associated videos cannot be used to make a diagnosis or treat any health condition. The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such. The information in this video is provided “as is” without any representations or warranties, express or implied. Brooke Goldner, M.D. is not acting as your medical provider. —-

Aaya’s Table — A CNS Microgrant Recipient Provides Hospitals With Culinary Assistance – Center for Nutrition Studies

 

Aaya’s Table — A CNS Microgrant Recipient Provides Hospitals With Culinary Assistance

The following is an article from a Community Leads grant recipient.

A weathered envelope with international stamps delivered from India would sometimes arrive in my family’s mailbox. First to our townhouse in Australia and then, when we moved to the US, all the way to the suburbs of Minneapolis. As a child, these letters always brought a big smile to my face because they would be addressed to a “Master Varun,” the polite British English title used for a boy too young to be called “Mister.” Growing up, I only ever heard two people address anyone that way—the character Alfred from the Batman comics and my thaatha (grandfather) who hailed from the small village of Tindivanam and kept his English sharp with those letters to me.

Soon after I turned eleven, those beloved letters stopped coming.We had gone earlier that year to India to visit our extended family, but the trip turned from joyous and relaxing to a panicked health crisis when I was awoken in the middle of the night on the remote family farm by the sound of thaatha’s loud groans, coughing, and spitting. Hours later in the hospital, I learned that thaatha had been suffering from congestive heart failure. He survived the night, but lived only a few months longer. He was 67 years old.

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The following year, my thaatha on my father’s side passed suddenly from a cardiac event at 68 years of age. Next, an uncle passed away from complications from a stroke he had suffered in his early 40s a decade earlier. A couple years after that, my mom’s only brother, 47 at the time, succumbed to a massive heart attack. My aaya (grandmother) was the longest-living relative I knew, living to a grand 75 years of age, out living a son and husband, and enduring worsening diabetes for nearly fifteen years before we got the late-night overseas call that is infamous among many immigrants with family abroad. By college, I had a genuine fear any time the phone rang past seven or eight in the evening. The creeping thought was always: “Who is it this time?” After a ten-year respite, my father’s oldest sister died suddenly at 62 after her previously untreated diabetes progressed to kidney disease, and my 24-year-old cousin lost his battle with leukemia. Like many southeast Asians, my fate seemed sealed by genetics.

Aaya’s Table

Considering my family history, it should be no big surprise that I was pre-med in college. Joining the world of medicine was the only way I could think to avenge or somehow honor the deaths in the family. I wound up becoming a biomedical engineer and found great satisfaction in product development in the medical device industry. I started as a bright-eyed kid whose every working moment was filled with the promise and potential of improving medicine and helping people. It took almost ten years in the industry, beginning at a startup and working my way into a large corporation, before I identified a glaring contradiction: despite the advancements in medical technology that I was a part of, the prevalence of chronic illness was continuing to grow and our healthcare system was struggling to manage it.

I always cite The China Study as the big inspiration for pivoting my career. My partner at the time (now fiancé) had recommended it for my long commutes, and the timing of when I finished it was really uncanny. I finished it just before landing in New Orleans for the Orthopedic Research Society conference. Normally I would gravitate toward the talks and presentations with the most novel science behind them, but that conference I found myself revisiting this one particular poster from the Midwest detailing how newer joint replacement implants didn’t survive much better than age-old tech because of obesity, diabetes, and other chronic illnesses that I had just been reading could be prevented with food. It was a lightbulb moment for me, and also very humbling since I was the lead engineer designing a robotically implanted, 3D-printed knee replacement device.

A few months later, I took on a role as Brand Ambassador for Beyond Meat, who were not yet public. I didn’t know exactly how to do it, but I wanted to be part of the movement of weaning America off the foods deleterious to their health. As a bonus, Beyond Meat still had that exciting startup feel that I was missing from the earliest part of my career. I began by working evenings and weekends to help share my newfound passion for plant-based nutrition.

By then I essentially had one foot out the door of the medical device industry but since I’m rather risk averse, I was still waiting for my own vision of how to influence healthcare. There’s a proverb that with every step one takes, regardless of knowing the particular direction, it’s the right step and will beget the next; standing still gets you nowhere. Over the six months or so, I had facetime with close to a thousand individuals that allowed me to discuss not only plant-based meat alternatives, but also the underlying motivations and challenges of lifestyle change. The common challenge I heard again and again was the need for more resources and support. Connecting the dots between eating well and achieving improved health is not always obvious or easy. By early 2019, I had the direction I needed to start Aaya’s Table and a mission to bring healthy, whole food, plant-based (WFPB) home cooking to diverse American homes.

In name and purpose Aaya’s Table pays homage to family history, both mine and those of too many others that have seen the effects of chronic illness on their loved ones. Whereas we typically associate grandma’s cooking and those special family recipes with comfort and homeliness, I want to also solidify the link between that food and good health. Following a predominantly plant-based diet to improve wellbeing does not have to mean forgoing the good food we grew up eating. In many cases, the old culinary traditions were in fact better for us than we ever realized. The Aaya’s Table team works with our clients to learn about their preferred cuisines and food aversions to ensure that they keep the familiar flavors while leaving behind the added oils, sugars, and animal products we know cause chronic disease.

Aaya’s Table — A CNS Microgrant Recipient Provides Hospitals With Culinary Assistance

This personalized approach emphasizes cultural significance. The ability to cater meal plans to people of all backgrounds is a major differentiator for us, and stems in part from my own challenges when becoming plant-based. I grew up eating the most flavorful and spicy Indian dishes, most of which begin with a sauté of onion, garlic, ginger and spices in heaping of oil or butter—a thali or takda. That’s the backbone of a lot of the food I love, so when I decided to change my diet, and to become WFPB at that, I couldn’t relate to many of the recipes out there. Many of our clients face similar challenges when trying to embrace change, and we believe that it does a big disservice to give up the complex flavors and aromas of their generations-old family recipes in exchange for brown rice and steamed veggies. So, we strive for even better than the middle ground and more than just a sprinkle of dried chili flakes.

Ultimately, I want delicious meals to lead to impressive stories of health regained. Aaya’s Table is the culinary arm that physicians embracing lifestyle change can refer their patients to. That relationship and trust with healthcare providers is not altogether different from those from my medical device days. Only now, I’m proud to be able to share with them the success stories of individuals partaking in our Culinary Rehabilitation (CuReTM) Program. We have some strong early results, but there remains a long journey before “food as medicine” takes its rightful place as a cornerstone of our healthcare system. Hopefully Aaya’s Table can make some significant contributions along with the inspiring work of other plant-based leaders.

Eat well, feel better.
-Varun Ponmudi

The T. Colin Campbell Center for Nutrition Studies (CNS) is committed to increasing awareness of the extraordinary impact that food has on the health of our bodies, our communities, and our planet. In support of this commitment, CNS has created a Community Leads service initiative to empower sustainable food-based initiatives around the world by providing grants to enable innovative start-ups and to propel the growth of existing initiatives. Please consider making a donation to this great cause. 100% of your donation will go to support initiatives like the one you just read about in this article.

Learn more about Community Leads:

https://nutritionstudies.org/community-leads-service-initiative/

Source: Aaya’s Table — A CNS Microgrant Recipient Provides Hospitals With Culinary Assistance – Center for Nutrition Studies

Cold and Flu Season: Healthy Immune System Strategies | Dr. David Marquis

Dr. David Marquis discusses strategies we can utilize to support strong immune system function during “Cold and Flu Season”; the importance of optimal vitamin D levels, sugar’s role, proper sleep, avoiding nutrient deficient foods, the benefits of consuming healthy fats, and the impact of the holidays on your microbiome. He also encourages parents to help guide their children towards anti-inflammatory, nutrient rich diet choices as we spend more time together.
Disclaimer: The entire contents of this Video and YouTube Channel are based upon the opinions of Dr. David Marquis, unless otherwise noted. Videos are based upon the opinions of the respective author. The information on this website is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with your own health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. It is intended as a sharing of knowledge and information from the research and experience of Dr. Marquis. Dr. Marquis encourages you to make your own health care decisions based upon your research and in partnership with your own health care professional. If you are pregnant, nursing, taking medication, or have a medical condition, consult your health care professional before using products.

Diet: Only Hope for Arthritis |Dr. John McDougall

Also see: Arthritis

A dentist writes, “In April of 1994 I met you briefly at the Michigan Dental Association Annual Meeting in Grand Rapids. During this seminar, I asked you about my 4-year-old son having juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Bryan was on 35 mg of prednisone (a powerful steroid) and 1200 mg of Advil daily. He was in so much pain he screamed and cried day and night. In one year he lost weight and did not grow one inch. His blood work reflected a sed rate of over 40 (This is a measurement of severity of inflammation and should be below 5). The suggestions you gave me that day lead me to remove all animal products from his diet, as well as refined carbohydrates.”

“Within six months, we had Bryan off all his medication. He was free of pain, gaining weight and growing again. His last blood work was superb with a sed rate of 1 – can you believe it!”

That’s how bad it can get. But for millions arthritis is much more subtle. Marvin Burk (Louise’s husband–Louise works in the McDougall Health Center office) couldn’t hardly get out of the chair. Then he would walk straddle-legged halfway across the room until he could loosen up enough to get his joints moving. His hands were so stiff he could not use his tools and he often dropped things. He figured a man of 65 shouldn’t be so crippled and decided he’d do whatever it takes to get well. He changed his diet 8 years ago with immediate and dramatic results. Now he pops out of the chair, walks without a bit of stiffness or pain and he handles his tools with no trouble. Many of us can relate to Marvin’s troubles.

People’s Most Common Affliction

Diseases of the muscles and bones are among the most common of all human afflictions, affecting all ages, but becoming more prevalent with years. Government surveys indicate in the United States approximately 33% of adults currently suffer from troublesome arthritis with symptoms of swelling, limitation of motion, or pain. Approximately half of all people over 65 years report having arthritis. The regions of the body most affected are the neck, lower back, hip and shoulder.

Arthritis means inflammation of a joint–no more, no less. The fact that a person has arthritis tells nothing about the cause or the cure. Joints can be inflamed as a result of an injury, such as from tripping and spraining an ankle. That’s called traumatic arthritis. Joints can be infected with bacteria resulting in suppurative arthritis. Uric acid crystals can accumulate in the joints causing gouty arthritis. The causes of all three of these forms of arthritis are known and once the causes are stopped the joints heal. Unfortunately, most forms of arthritis are said by doctors to have “no known cause.” And whether or not they will admit it, there is no cure to be found in modern drug therapy either.

Degenerative and Inflammatory

Arthritis of “no known cause” can be divided into two broad categories: degenerative arthritis and inflammatory arthritis. Degenerative arthritis most commonly represents a condition known as osteoarthritis. This is the most common arthritis found in people living in Western civilizations–seen in x-rays of the hands of over 70% of people 65 years and older. However, this same disease is comparatively rare in African and Asian countries, where people physically labor to survive (Br J Rheumatol 24:321, 1985). How can that be? Osteoarthritis is said to be due to wear and tear on the joints, so why is it less common among hard working people of underdeveloped countries? Nor does it explain why with light use, the hands of women often become twisted and deformed with age.

The inflammatory forms of arthritis include juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, lupus, and ankylosing spondylitis. These aggressive diseases affect less than 5% of the people living in the United States today. Classifying these inflammatory diseases by different names, such as rheumatoid or lupus provides no further benefits to the patient, because it does not lead to better understanding of the cause of the inflammation, or to the successful treatment of the disease.

People diagnosed with degenerative arthritis (osteoarthritis) have inflammation in their joints in addition to the long-standing damage (degeneration). This inflammation can often be stopped with a change in diet and the swelling, pain, and stiffness relieved. What won’t change in either form of arthritis is the permanent destruction left by years of disease, leaving deformity, stiffness and pain. To understand how most people with arthritis can be helped by a healthy diet, I will focus on the more aggressive inflammatory forms of arthritis.

Hope for Arthritis Sufferers

Arthritis is not a genetic disease, nor is it an inevitable part of growing older–there are causes for these joint afflictions, and they lie in our environment–our closest contact with our environment is our food. Some researchers believe rheumatoid arthritis did not exist anywhere in the world before 1800 (Arthritis Rheum 34:248, 1991). It is well documented that these forms of arthritis were once rare to nonexistent in rural populations of Asia and Africa (Chung Hua Nei Ko Tsa Chih 34:79, 1995; Arthritis Rheum 34:248, 1991). As recently as 1957, no case of rheumatoid arthritis could be found in Africa. That was a time when people in Africa followed diets based on grains and vegetables.

These once unknown joint diseases are now becoming common as people migrate to wealthier nations or move to the big cities in their native countries. With these changes they abandoned their traditional diets of grains and vegetables for meat, dairy products, and highly processed foods (J Rheumatol 19:2, 1992; Ann Rheum Dis 49:400, 1991). For example, although unknown in Africa before 1960, African-Americans lead in the incidence of lupus in the US (J Am Med Women’s Assoc 1998;53(1):9-12). The mechanisms by which an unhealthy diet causes inflammatory arthritis are complex and poorly understood, but involve our intestine and immune system.

Continue reading …

The ways in which excess sugar affects brain function | Dr. Joel Fuhrman

Food affects us in so many ways – physically, emotionally, intellectually and cognitively. In our society, high-fat, high-sugar foods, meat and alcohol are associated with celebration and comfort, but when we look at the scientific studies, we see overwhelming evidence that adhering to an unhealthy eating style, such as the standard American diet (SAD), has serious consequences.

In this post, we’ll look at one of the biggest culprits in the Western diet:1 added sugars. Regular and excessive consumption of sugar is associated with poorer cognitive function, increased risk of depression or dementia, or reduced brain volume.2-7  Even in short-term studies, detriments to learning, memory, or attention have been detected.

Sources:

Western diet consumption and cognitive impairment: links to hippocampal dysfunction and obesity.

Diabetes, sugar-coated but harmful to the brain.

Diet-Induced Cognitive Deficits: The Role of Fat and Sugar, Potential Mechanisms and Nutritional Interventions.

Foods, nutrients, and the brain

Brain function, including learning, memory, mood, attention, processing speed, and motor function, is profoundly affected by the foods we eat. Over decades, a poor diet can impair brain health through nutrient insufficiencies, oxidative stress, inflammation, and vascular damage. This can lead to depression, dementia, or a decline in cognitive function. In contrast, vitamins, minerals, antioxidant nutrients, and other phytochemicals have protective effects.

Omega-3 fatty acids are structural components of brain cell membranes that influence learning, memory, and mood. Fast food and commercial baked goods are associated with depression,8 whereas vegetable, fruit, and phytochemical intake is associated with reduced risk of depression,9-12 and dietary interventions effective at improving mood and reducing depression symptoms.13-15It is true when they say, “good food, good mood.”

Neuroinflammation could underlie the deficits in attention, learning, and memory that are associated with a poor diet. There is growing consensus among researchers that pro-inflammatory diet components, such as added sugars and saturated fats, lead to insulin resistance, systemic inflammation, and neuroinflammation. The good news is that phytochemicals in vegetables and fruits may help to prevent or slow loss of cognitive function with age by lowering oxidative stress and inflammation.16-19

Related: Omega-3 fatty acids, DHA and EPA, are crucial for brain health through all stages of life
Related: Short-term dietary intervention improves depression symptoms
Position Paper: Treating Depression Naturally (free for members)

Sources:

Diet quality and depression risk: A systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies.

Is Psychological Well-Being Linked to the Consumption of Fruit and Vegetables?

A brief diet intervention can reduce symptoms of depression in young adults – A randomised controlled trial.

Food for thought: how nutrition impacts cognition and emotion.

Dietary intakes of berries and flavonoids in relation to cognitive decline.

Long-term intake of nuts in relation to cognitive function in older women.

The dangers of “junk foods”

Continue reading:

Source: The ways in which excess sugar affects brain function

How long do I have to take this pill? | Stephanie Spencer

View my FREE Plant-Based Nutrition Webinar

Almost) everything you ever wanted to know about a Plant-Based Diet but were afraid to ask! To enroll in the full course, click: https://stephanie-s-school-912e.think…. Enter coupon code HEALWITHPLANTS for 10% off!

Have you ever been sitting in the exam room with your doctor as he or she is reviewing your lab work?  They discuss your health risks due to your weight/cholesterol/blood pressure/ blood sugar numbers and recommend starting or adding another pill since your attempted dietary changes thus far haven’t worked.  And you ask…

How long will I have to take this pill?

When you ask your doctor this question, you may notice a suppressed chuckle or a flash of surprise across their face.  That’s because they usually assume your underlying problem (heart disease, Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure) will never, ever go away.  We will have to “manage” it for the rest of your life until you progress to a point where you need invasive procedures or suffer a life-altering event or injury such as a heart attack or stroke that can greatly diminish the quality of your life and your ability to care for yourself.   I’m a cardiac RN and I spent about 20 years in the field of “chronic disease management” caring for individuals suffering from heart failure.  And that’s the problem-we are so busy “managing” these diseases that everyone seems to have that we don’t focus on the cause of the problem (it’s the food), or even know that we can reverse the underlying conditions that cause these diseases.  Many in the medical field don’t even know that diseases like Type 2 diabetes and heart disease have been demonstrated to be reversible with a Whole Food Plant-Based Diet through many randomized controlled clinical trials published in the Lancet, the Journal of the American Medical Association, and many more. Through the work of Plant-Based Pioneers such as Dr’s T. Colin Campbell,  Caldwell Esselstyn, and Neal Barnard, I learned that many of these chronic diseases such as high blood pressure, heart disease, and Type 2 diabetes were frequently reversible on a Whole Food Plant-Based Diet.  But at the time, I wasn’t quite ready to switch to that diet myself because I figured my husband and I were “pretty healthy” and besides, I had three teenage aged boys in the house. Until one day, my husband came home from the doctor with blood work showing that he was in fact,  pre-diabetic. This was a huge wake-up call for me. I had spent my entire working life trying to “manage” patients who were frequently ill with what started as diabetes and just kept getting sicker and sicker until they could no longer care for themselves. I vowed that this would never happen to my husband.  So without waiting for anyone’s (meaning my kids’) blessing, I just quit purchasing meat and dairy at the store. And believe it or not, it really wasn’t that hard! We learned to eat a lot of exciting new ethnic food, incorporated fiber-filled whole grains and legumes in our diet, watched as the pounds fell off of our bodies and enjoyed never being hungry in between meals for the first time in our lives.  And after 4 months, we rechecked Paul’s blood-work and his pre-diabetes had been reversed!  After Paul’s massive health transformation, and realizing how easy it is to eat the food that makes us the healthiest, I obtained a Certification in Plant-Based Nutrition through the T. Colin Campbell Center for Nutrition Studies through Cornell University.  And now I want to be able to share this life-changing information with everyone!

Stephanie