Inhaled Microplastics Found in Lung Tissue — Are Face Masks Contributing to the Problem? | By Colleen Huber, NMD | The Defender | Childrenshealthdefense.org

05/02/22

Researchers in the U.K. who sampled human lung tissue identified 39 kinds of microplastics in 11 of 13 tissue samples. The most commonly found was polypropylene, which also is the most common material used to make face masks.

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A new U.K. study from Hull York Medical School sampled human lung tissue using micro-Fourier Transform Infrared (micro FTIR) spectroscopy.

Thirty-nine kinds of microplastics were identified in 11 of the 13 lung tissue samples of patients who were to undergo surgery.

The most commonly found microplastics were polypropylene (23%), polyethylene terephthalate (18%) and resin (15%). Tissue from male donors contained nearly six times the microplastics of tissue from female donors.

It had been thought that only particles smaller than 3 micrometers (µm) can enter the alveolar region of the lung. However, the particles seen in this study were up to 1,410 µm in length (1.4 mm).

What does this have to do with masks?

Continued on Source: Inhaled Microplastics Found in Lung Tissue — Are Face Masks Contributing to the Problem?

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