How One Neighborhood is Transforming an Abandoned Elementary School into a Flourishing Community Hub | The Blue Zones Project

 

T-shirt entrepreneurs-turned-farmers are turning an abandoned elementary school into a community hub.

In a long-abandoned school playground, a small-scale farm is planting seeds for a more equitable and sustaining food system in a neighborhood where fresh, affordable food is hard to come by.

The Midtown Farm in Tucson, Arizona, is an offshoot of the Flowers & Bullets Collective in the Barrio Centro neighborhood. Tito Romero and Jacob Robles, friends since childhood now in their early 30s, launched the organization in 2012 to provide healthy food alternatives, to improve their neighborhood, and to share their Latino and Indigenous cultures. “The idea of growing food, being sustainable, has been a trend for some time in predominantly White, middle-class communities,” Robles says. “For communities in the barrio, communities of color, those trends don’t reach us as easily.”

The idea of growing food, being sustainable, has been a trend for some time in predominantly White, middle-class communities…For communities in the barrio, communities of color, those trends don’t reach us as easily. —@BCGCproject

Continued on Source: Growing Food and Latino Culture in Tucson’s Barrio Centro